Supply Chain Law

The antitrust laws also affect a variety of “vertical” relationships — those involving firms at different levels of the supply chain — such as manufacturer-dealer or supplier-manufacturer. Restraints in the supply chain are tested for their reasonableness, by analyzing the market in detail and balancing any harmful competitive effects against offsetting benefits. In general, the law views most vertical arrangements as beneficial overall because they reduce costs and promote efficient distribution of products. A vertical arrangement may violate the antitrust laws, however, if it reduces competition among firms at the same level (say among retailers or among wholesalers) or prevents new firms from entering the market. This is particularly a concern in markets with few sellers or those dominated by one seller. In these markets, manufacturer- or supplier-imposed restraints may make it difficult for newcomers or firms with innovative products to find outlets and reach consumers.

Resources

View the following 3rd-party publications about this topic. This will help further introduce the topic allowing us to discuss this matter and its applicability to your unique personal and business matters. This firm does not endorse the 3rd party site and provides it for general reference only.

Firm’s Practice Areas

 
ryan_cruz_law_san_diego_attorney_legal_help_business_corp_LLC_contract
ryan_cruz_law_san_diego_attorney_san_diego_california_legal_help_house_business
ryan_cruz_law_san_diego_attorney_legal_help_wills_trusts_planning
ryan_cruz_law_san_diego_attorney_san_diego_california_legal_help_trade_secret_trademark_copyright
ryan_cruz_law_san_diego_attorney_san_diego_california_legal_help_problem_fight_dispute